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OSCOLA for Law

Bibliography Format

Check your Module Guide but the general format is:​

  • List all the cases in alphabetical order by case name under the heading “Cases”. ​

  • List all the legislation in alphabetical order by title under the heading “Legislation”. ​

  • List all the other sources you used (including books, journal articles, and web-sites) in alphabetical order by author surname under the heading “Other sources”. 

This guidance is taken from Roehampton's Law School. For long pieces of work you may be required to put a table of cases and a table of legislations at the start of the document. Always check your module guide to find out which layout you are expected to use.

Footnotes vs Bibliography

There are differences between the format for the footnote reference and the biblography.

Case example

Footnote: 

Murray v Express Newspapers Plc [2008] EWCA Civ 446, [2009] Ch 481.

The case name is in italics. There is a fullstop at the end.

Bibliography:

Murray v Express Newspapers Plc [2008] EWCA Civ 446, [2009] Ch 481

There is no full stop at the end in the bibliography.


Legislation example

Footnote: 

Human Rights Act 1998, s 3(2)(a).

Include the section, subsection and paragraph if your are referring to specific part of the act. There is a full stop at the end.

Bibliography:

Human Rights Act 1998 (UK)

There is no full stop at the end. Include the country in brackets if you are citing legislation from more than one country.

Note: If an act has been referred to in full in your work, you do not need to include a footnote.

Secondary source - book example

Footnote:

Alan Dignam and John Lowry, Company Law (10th edn, OUP 2018).

First name and surname written out in full. There is a full stop at the end.

Bibliography:

Dignam A and Lowry J, Company Law (10th edn, OUP 2018)

Write the surname first and then the initials of the first name. There is no full stop at the end.

Secondary source - journal article example

Footnote:

Joelle Grogan, ‘Rights and Remedies at Risk: Implications of the Brexit Process on the Future of Rights in the UK’ [2019] PL 683.

First name and surname written out in full. There is a full stop at the end.

Bibliography:

Grogan J, ‘Rights and Remedies at Risk: Implications of the Brexit Process on the Future of Rights in the UK’ [2019] PL 683

Write the surname first and then the initials of the first name. There is no full stop at the end.

If there is no volume for a journal, use square brackets around the year: [2019]. 

If there is volume information for a journal, use round brackets around the year: (2019).